Her mother appears to have been an associate of Shaftesbury Abbey called Wynflæd (also Wynnflæd). F. Liebermann, Die Heiligen Englands. 0896-0950. About FamilySearch . Ælfgifu and her husband were separated on grounds of consanguinity by Oda Archbishop of Canterbury[1706], but the precise relationship has not been found. 6. Inops uisus et auditus si adorant tumulum. 17-8). 0922-0944. In raids on northern Mercia the following year, King Olaf took Tamworth and nearby land, and under a treaty agreed with King Edmund took the whole of modern Leicestershire, Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire. 0871-0959. Lantfred of Winchester, Translatio et Miracula S. Swithuni, ed. From that time he may be regarded as king of a united England. [2], Her mother appears to have been an associate of Shaftesbury Abbey called Wynflæd (also Wynnflæd). As in their contrary attitude to queens, the old kingdom of Wessex did not encourage leading roles for women in religious houses nor did they have many of their own saints. Marriage: about 939. "Ælfgifu 3", Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England. Family Members. Saint Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury (d. 944) was the first wife of King Edmund (I) of England (r. 939-946), by whom she bore two future kings, Eadwig (r. 955-959) and Edgar (r. 959-975). Probably her mother’s extensive lands would have made Ælfgifu a wealthy and attractive prospect for a king’s bride. Was canonized after her death and thus became known as Saint Elgiva. and tr. Unfortunately, 944 was a year of triumph and tragedy for it was at this time that Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury died, probably still only in her mid-twenties. Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury was the first consort of King Edmund I of England, and while her impact on the historical record was limited in life, in death she achieved the lucrative status of sainthood. Ælfgifu (morte en 944) est la première femme du roi d'Angleterre Edmond I er et la mère des rois Eadwig et Edgar. Æthelflæd married Edmund in 944 following the death of his first wife Ælfgifu, mother of the future kings Eadwig and Edgar. Author and Publisher - Catholic Online. Ælfgifu was venerated as a saint soon after her burial at Shaftesbury. [12] Her body was buried and enshrined at the nunnery. married "a prince near the Alps", sometimes identified with Conrad of Burgundy or Boleslaus II of Bohemia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_the_Elder. Post was not sent - check your email addresses! [m firstly] ([940]) ÆLFGIFU, daughter of --- & his wife Wynflæd --- (-Shaftesbury Abbey after 943). Leicester, 1964. H.P.R. It's all about family. Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Although Duke Boleslaw's birth date is not known, the birth of his younger brother Strakhvas is recorded on 28 Sep 929[1688]. Simon Keynes and Gale R. Owen object that there is no sign of royal relatives or connections in Wynflæd's will and Finberg's assumptions about Ælfgifu's family therefore stand on shaky ground. The latter suggestion is chronologically implausible, assuming that it refers to Ælfgifu's younger half-sister Eadgifu who was married according to William of Malmesbury to "Louis Prince of Aquitaine" (see below), as King Rudolf's children were probably born between 880 and 900. By the time of Edgar, the Saxons had imperial ambitions across Britain and were mindful of enhancing their status through their wives and mothers – women like Ælfgifu were not royal before marriage, but making her a saint elevated her to an even higher plain that would thus reflect well on Edgar (the son of a warrior king and a saintly queen) and his dynasty. Saint Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury was born 9999 in England to Wynflaed (c920-) and died 944 inEngland of unspecified causes. Marriage: Wynflæd of Shaftesbury. According to a pre-Conquest tradition from Winchester, her feast day is 18 May. Ælfgifu, the wife of Alfred's grandson, King Edmund I, was buried at Shaftesbury and soon venerated as a saint, and she came to be regarded by the house as its true founder. Sister of Eadmære, Spouse: King Edmund (I) of England (r. 939-946), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86lfgifu_of_Shaftesbury, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Edwarddied924B. According to a pre-Conquest tradition from Winchester, her feast day is 18 May. Æthelweard reports that many miracles had taken place at her tomb up to his day,[14] and these were apparently attracting some local attention. We look at who the real Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury was and how and … R.A.B. Wikipedia: Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury. As an infant, he was passed over for the succession in 946 in favour of his uncle. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death on St Augustine's day 946 of King Edmund[1693]. Après sa mort, elle fait l'objet d'un culte centré sur sa sépulture, à l'abbaye de Shaftesbury dans le Dorset. King Edmund & his first [wife] had two children: a) EADWIG ([940]-1 Oct 959, bur Winchester Cathedral). Edward the Elder's sainted kindred.” In Edward the Elder, 899-924, ed. Ælfgifu received it from her husband and intended to bequeath it back to the nunnery, but such had not yet come to pass (her son Eadwig demanded that Butticanlea was returned to the royal family first). Listen to her podcast episode here or read on to find out more. Saint Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury (d. 944) was the first wife of Edmund I (r. 939-946), by whom she bore two future kings, Eadwig (r. 955-959) and Edgar (r. 959-975). William of Malmesbury, Gesta regum Anglorum, ed. A Collaborative Edition. Wareham, Andrew. 252-333. Lord Sigehelm Of Meopham. Change ). The Anglo-Saxons only seem to have had room for one dominant woman at court, and in the 940s, that woman was Eadgifu, Edmund’s mother. “Dynastic monasteries and family cults. Although Duke Boleslaw's birth date is not known, the birth of his younger brother Strakhvas is recorded on 28 Sep 929[1688]. 0922-0944. We look at who the real Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury was and how and why she came to become a saint. [5], There is, however, no consensus among scholars about Finberg's suggestion. The people of Mercia and Northumbria rebelled against him in 957 and elected his brother Edgar king, after which the River Thames formed the boundary between the two kingdoms[1703]. Oxford, 1998. The Anglo-Saxon Minsters of Winchester 2. This lady held many estates scattered across the south of Wessex (Som., Wilts., Berks., Oxon., Hants.) and tr. Her patronage of the community is suggested by a charter of King Æthelred, dated 984, according to which the abbey exchanged with King Edmund the large estate at Tisbury (Wiltshire) for Butticanlea (unidentified). St. Elgiva of Shaftesbury. The History of the English Kings. This reference suggests that Ælfgifu was not married to King Edmund, corroborated by another charter of the same year1700 in which his [second] wife is differentiated by the epithet "regina" and the dating of which (if accurate) suggests that the king's relationship with both "wives" was simultaneous. [11] In the early 12th century, William of Malmesbury wrote that she suffered from an illness during the last few years of her life, but there may have been some confusion with details of Æthelgifu's life as recorded in a forged foundation charter of the late 11th or 12th century (see below). After her husband died, Elgiva retired to the convent at Shaftesbury. 36 (pp. It records that she received and retrieved from King Edmund a handful of estates in Dorset, namely Cheselbourne and Winterbourne Tomson, which somehow ended up in the possession of the community. Florence of Worcester records that he was stabbed to death by Leof "a ruffianly thief" while attempting to defend his steward from being robbed[1695]. Unfortunately, this is all largely retrospective and about her dynasty rather than about her, about whom we know very little. Even in the 970s, a young man was said to have kept vigil at her tomb in hope of being cured of blindness. 0940-0959. Her body was buried and enshrined at the nunnery. According to William of Malmesbury, she had been ill for a number of years, which might explain her limited presence on the historical record. Like her mother Wynflaed, she had a close and special if unknown connection with the royal nunnery of Shaftesbury founded by King Alfred, where she was buried and soon revered as a saint. A third possibility is that “iuxta Alpes” should be interpreted as meaning the area south of the Alps, indicating south-eastern France or northern Italy, although it would be fruitful to speculate on the identity of Ælfgifu´s husband if this is correct given the number of possibilities, especially if the title “duci” should be interpreted broadly.

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